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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,830 (some duplicates have been removed)
to develop very in depth content, but if they don't have a venue, they do not have a way to show us, then this work is only staying here inside and nobody knows the brilliance and the amazing work that the students are doing. >> the term has changed over time from a very basic who has a computer and who doesn't have a computer to now who has access to the internet, especially high speed internet, as well as the skills and the knowledge to use those tools effectively. . >> the city is charged with coming up with digital inclusion. the department of telecommunications put together a 15 member san francisco tech connect task force. we want the digital inclusion program to make sure we address the needs of underserved vulnerable communities, not communities that are already very tech savvy. we are here to provide a, b and c to the seniors. a stands for access. b stands for basic skills and c stands for content. and unless we have all three, the monolingual chinese seniors are never going to be able to use the computer or the internet. >> a lot of the barrier is knowledge. people don't k
of public health. >> thank you. the department is requesting that we use the state contract low of the city boilerplate, and this will put us in compliance with sb 785. this legislation, in regards to delivery of specialty mental health services for foster care children, and it mandates the use of standardized contracts statewide, so this would be for children that are placed out of county, and i have our director of children, youth, and families for the system of care for community behavioral health services. thank you. >> supervisors, this should give you an idea about the extent of the need. 534 children in foster care are facing -- are placed in san francisco. with the largest percentage placed in alameda county and san mateo counties. the reason they are placed in those counties is because half of them are placed with relatives, and the remaining in foster homes. they all actually have a right and need to access and services when they have the need. right now, it is not easy to enter contracts for services with them, so the change is to create more timing access for the children living
warning and give you examples of how early warning is being used various places around the world. the stage we're at with our implementation in california is we're looking for a small number of potential users, just to work with on on trying to define the kinds of information that uses it and how they want to receive it and how it can be used. as i mentioned, bart is a group. we have a few other groups that are starting to show interest and i'm hoping that the groups represented here might be interested in getting involved as well. and that's pretty much it. thank you. >> thank you. >> and we're going to ask if there's any questions. any questions from members of the disaster council for dr. allen? seeing none. thank you. are there any comments from the public at this time? seeing none, we're moving on and go back to item 4 and i believe we -- we need to switch some places here, right? okay. and so item number four is mapping vulnerable communities and the mayor's office on disability and -- susan meissner and karla johnson are here. >> good afternoon. i'm carla johnson and i'm h
to come and tell us what this is about. >> is there anyone from the code advisory committee here that could tell us what their discussion was? >> we did not ask for public comment yet. we asked if there is someone from code advisory. >> he is code advisory. >> my apologies. >> and actually on the disability subcommittee. we looked at it in a number of ways. this is creating another layer of bureaucracy. i do not really see why we have to go to the city, to the mayor's office to do that. you have another layer of bureaucracy, but also, we have had stuff go to the jobs, and they will wait forever to get a response from them. it is not like dbi where you can get the plan checked over the counter. when these go out in the field, they check for the correct dimensions here we as of this was really a necessary to be done. for every job to go in, we just feel it is unnecessary. >> good morning, commissioners. i'm also on the code advisory committee. there may not even be an interest from the mayor's office on disability in doing and receiving a packet, from what i understand, this seems
america, and they made the ultimate sacrifice for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and all the infrastructure that was here. beca
will be running away from us. when you come after four weeks, you will be relaxed tomorrow is the beginning of the holy ramadan for the muslim people are would like to say to every muslim that lives here, happy ramadan. tomorrow, many of us will be passed -- the fasting. that is our religion. but like to present my city, of my country, the people that i loved and you are one of them. i worry about you. you worry about me, i'd worry about you. i never feel that i am different. i never feel that i'm different than any supervisor because i believe we are family and we are family. god bless you and bless everyone. take care. >> good afternoon, supervisors do not except money from the friends of the foundation. usually i come here to speak to the audience. today, i want to address the supervisors. on occasion, president chu says that this slows down businesses. this is a very poor reason but slowing things might be good. the reason that expressions of approval of disapproval are discouraged because they are inconsistent with 8 the liberty of body which must show respect for the minority opinion.
feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 years ago -- things have changed quite a bit. we believe this would bring increased vitality to the neighborhood, increased spending in the city that would help overall -- the overall economy. when we look at the political will, we look at financing options and opportunities to take next that's. the best opportunity is mosconi east in 2008. that would be a perfect time live from what we believe meets the demand that is growing at the moment. the last thing i want to talk about his proposition j, the proposition to increase the hotel tax. it increases it two points, 14%. it just went up 13% two years ago, so we would have a 25% increase in hotel taxes in just a few years. it i
and taxes. my financial needs are high. in this economy, none of us can afford to lose our jobs. >> next speaker. >> ion a store located in the marina, and i am here to represent district 2. first of all, he does have a good voice. we are not multimillionaire's. we do not have high-paid lobbyists. i appreciate when the supervisors listen. we also do not have a communications director on full- time express. we are small, hard working businesses. we really are, and my speech is to talk about how benevolent we are as small business owners. there are a couple of supervisors i hope will listen to how challenging it is to be able to compete with not only this chain store but also the perspective of the other big chain stores potentially coming. i feel it is appropriate to give a few examples as to how benevolent. of the gives thousands of dollars to the organization and rigid bobb -- bobby give thousands of dollars to the organization paws, and they have taken donations from pet food express fear reagan -- pet food express. >> thank you very much. next speaker please. >> i have listened to the
who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and then come i want to the knowledge and leadershi
with a mixed use development, which would be a unique public-private partnership. it would be a tremendous opportunity to expand mosconi and improve the neighborhood. it would improve the entrance to the neighborhood on third street. right now, stoney is a very unattractive entry into san francisco -- mosconi is a very unattractive entry into san francisco. the other would be the north-sow 3 configuration, which would require excavating under howard street, which would have done when we first built mosconi south. it would have only cost $3 million. connect north and south and make it one large exhibit space. that would provide the total exhibition space between 500,000 square feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 ye
hard to get us here. i want to thank those just once again, the secretary, for his willingness to think differently and look differently at this project. this project was dead many many times, but it was because of his willingness to look at this in a new light and consider things that previous secretaries of the navy had not considered because of the great work of his staff and both the department of defense and because, more importantly, of the incredible commitment, not just passing interest, speaker ned to pelosi, who started this thing through three presidential administrations, secretaries of navy, mayors like me that come and go, members of the board of supervisors, treasure island development authority that stuck it out for all this time. to nancy pelosi, thank you yet again. what a remarkable effort. you deserve an enormous amount of credit. we thank you. we are proud of you. this is a big deal. on top of that, hunters point, which was a big deal. trans a terminal, doyle drive, the bay bridge. this is just getting things done. it is my honor now to ask up to the podium a fan of
recycling at home and use these bins you see behind me. i do not want this to become a psa for our recycling efforts, although that is always good, and remember, it is the kids teaching the adults, which is always good. but this is good for the environment, good for the economy, and a san francisco can do this, cities across california and cities across america can do this. i will remind you of the great line by michelangelo, who said that the biggest risk is not that we aim to hawaii and miss but that we aim to low and --. it would have been easy for us to have a goal of 50% recycling rate by 2020. a lot of states, a lot of cities across the state, that will be tow%8x4รง:vw1qs8mna ++%uq when you do that, you get people to organize that quality of imagination, where people in the private sector and public sector, using the entrepreneurial and innovative spirit coming up with new ideas and attitudes that may seem untoward or a little controversial or extreme at first, but suddenly, when you peel it back and look back two or three years, you go, "my gosh, that makes so much since." if you make
staffer, now my staffer, who worked so diligently through two administrations to get us through this day. i thank you. to the development team. to the residents of this island that have been patient beyond imagination. with the hope and expectation we would get to this point. to all those that are looking forward to the ground breaking to be hosted some time next year. it is pretty remarkable -- this is a small city, and about 10% of our land happens to be on three principal areas. all three of them former naval bases. out there in hunters point. the army out on presidio, and here on treasure island. 25-plus-hundred acres in the '70s -- the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. since then, we have been talking about revitalization. we have been talking about reconstituting these pieces of property. just two weeks ago i had the pleasure and privilege of signing 12 pieces of legislation, marking over the course of over two decades over the course of hunters point. creating a framework on an economic development framework for 10,500 new housing units, 32% of them below market. hundreds of thousa
us to overcome many of the challenges that we have faced, as you will hear throughout the program. part of what makes today so sweet is it was not easy to get here. it was really hard. there were a lot of bumps on the road to this fantastic moment, many things we could not have anticipated, many things we did not know. throughout it, the mayor has always supported it, help us to solve the problems we face. i think the biggest part of the to be to him is the fact that this is the first leed building -- the environmental certification -- the first leed hospital in california to be built. i think that really speaks to his commitment to environmental issues at a time, 12 years ago, when it was not so popular, and it seemed like a quixotic kind of adventure to be talking about it. he said it was real. he was right. now people talk about it as a day to day economic reality. mr. mayor? >> thank you, doctor, and thank you all for taking the time to be here today. to begin with, i would like to recognize a couple of people. one person whose spirit is here, but whose sisters took the time t
that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicat
gathered to remember those who died in the attacks on the world trade center. eric shawn joining us now. an emotion day for so many nine years later. >> it may have been nine years, but today at some points it didn't seem as if a second had gone by. a second when islamic radical terrorists targeted america. members andmily officials and many others gathered here once again for the eighth time at ground zero to remember, to honor,or tey gathered orrow and in grief to pay tribute to those who were killed here. they brought signs and flowers, as well as roses that they placed in the reflective pools and american flags. yet again they recited the names of all the victims, 2752 who were killed byqa al-qaeda, including 343 new york city firefighters. there was no direct mention during the ceremonies ofhe controversy involving the islamic center proposal a few blocks from here. during the ceremony, vice president joeo biden attended, along with his wife, jill, and they placed a flower in the t reflective pool, walking there along with the governors of new york and new jersey and new york city
usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that facility we are so pr
. there is a denial of our existence. i am asking if you can help us and work with us to guide society as a whole to recognize us as a people. our ancestors have participated in ceremonies and then within the city limits of in san francisco. we are asking to recognize these things and to allow us to continue to participate in these ceremonies. you know that our future generations can continue to participate in the ceremonies. that is what we're asking for here, for help. our tribe as a city entity can work together to. recognition for our people. we can work on being a part of this society and being a part of the way of life in which we live. >> i am here to let you all know that we have been participating in ceremonies since before my time. to let you guys buying no -- guys know that you can work with us and to have respect for ourselves and give us the opportunity to show the people in the communities that we are still here and we are not going anywhere. and to give us some space and time to show the community that we are still here and to show the future generations to come and we are still wi
have a strong and salsa-type music following. so a lot of us came down here in san francisco to joey's specifically on sunday's. so i know as far as all my companions from sacramento that we really enjoy jelly's. and we'll certainly regret it. all of us have felt safe at joey's, it advocated a clean, healthy, fun environment. i'm not aware of the details. i don't believe this is something that was due to joey's and their way of operation. i'd like to express my support for continuation of joey's. thank you. >> for public comment -- >> good morning. i'd like to speak about the waterfront land use plant study. >> this is situation is intolerable. to break up a club and put up a tower, which is against the waterfront plan use specifications that they should connect the land to the bay is crazy. they speak out of two sides of their mouth. that's called corruption. this is not about money and greed. hundreds of car garages is wrong. it's an already difficult situation we have now, so how could you approve a plan like this? it's ridiculous. all we can think of is what's behind all this. an
transportation, to come to san francisco to be here with us. when he leaves today, he will take with him this memento. it is a little shovel. we are giving you a paper shovel made right here in san francisco that has embedded in it native plant from the presidio. take them to your house, put them in a pot and you will have a piece of the presidio park with forever. it may even bloom. plastic? no, it is recycled american paper. american trees. there you have it, the ultimate sustainable gift. victor mendez is an extremely good choice as the highway administrator. he has been on the job exactly one year and three days. victor was here in october to help us kickoff the project. he oversees almost 3000 employees at the highway administration. it is no stranger to overseeing things. as director of the arizona highway department, he had a challenge their. he is a civil engineer. i always like to say -- since i am a civil engineer, too -- we can actually manage, and many of them do. they can think big. there is another example of someone not buying the traditional idea of what a freeway is, how
immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what are we going to do? i could not provide a work
and let us know if there is anything else that should not be unfair. -- should not be in there. >> what is before us is one additional pet food express. if we were to reject this and allow it to go forward, what if two more came before us. is there any point the planning department would have a concern that it would be predatory, or is that not how the department looks at these things? i came in when we had the appeal on toyota and starbucks thinking i was going to go in one direction, and when i heard the testimony of the neighborhood, i could not support for melo retail, so what is more interesting is to understand -- support formula retail, so what is more important is to understand, if you want to come up with another one, you need to go to the southeast part of the city. is there any guidance we are going to get, or are we honor anna -- on our own for this one? >> i think the issue is the basis by which we do our analysis. the reason most are in conditional uses is we look at them on a case by case basis. we look at the immediate area, and that is a comfortable walking distance to
want to take that moment and reflect on his contribution. let us also take a moment to reflect on the doctor. we are blessed. you do not want to be the best of the best. you want to be only the one who does what you do. his commitment to public health in san francisco is second to none. he has done an extraordinary job leading by example. this is a city that is doing things that no other city in the united states of america could even imagine doing, things that even when we had all the resources in the world and all the capacity, things that cities could not do. this commitment to an acute care, facility, a skilled nursing facility -- what county is having a ribbon cutting on a new nursing facility in this modern age? and what city and county can lay claim to comprehensive universal health care, regardless of pre- existing conditions, regardless of your ability to pay? dr. mitch kastz has been the architect of all of this. thank you for your leadership. there is the old play towline that if there is any hope for the future of those with lanterns will pass them on to others. let
or materials up to $50,000. it is rare that we get anything close to that, but it would help. we generally use those monies to pay for any kind of animal welfare needs that we have. in these tight budget times, we have seen a lot more animals coming in to the shelter with a lot more needs, especially veterinary needs. or materials and supplies have been running really high. we generally take money from those donations to offset the medical care of the animals. that is the background on how it came up. i am happy to answer any other questions you have. chairperson mar: sure. hopefully this leads to more big donations to panel welfare. >> i would not mind. we can use it. chairperson mar: let us open this up to public comment. is there anyone from the public would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. it is moved and seconded without objection. please call item two. >> item 2, hearing on the recently published 2009-2010 civil grand jury report entitled "sharing the roadway -- from confrontation to conversation." chairperson mar: this is an item based on a 2009-2010 civil grand jur
consider this at the next gao meeting. are there any other items before us? >> no, there are not. supervisor mar: thank you so much, everyone. meeting adjourned. chair maxwell: good afternoon, and welcome to land use. we have got quite a crowd, so the overflow room is in the chambers, and you will be able to hear when we call names, and we usually wait, and if somebody comes, which usually allow them to get in line. we we usually allow them to get in line. i want to thank all of the people at channel 26 -- we usually allow them to get in line. i want to thank the people behind the scenes very much for their work. i also want to thank lisa so mera, who is our clerk. vice chair supervisor eric mar and supervisor david chiu. madam clerk, i believe you have some things to say. clerk somera: please turn off of your cell phones. items will appear on a later agenda. chair maxwell: i believe we have an item that will be going to the board tomorrow, and that will be item number two. madam clerk, could you please read the first item. clerk somera: a special use district for 1800 market str
with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just >> i work with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and w
. officials shut down both directions of u.s. 1 and students at nearby university of maryland have received notice of university of miami -- university of miami and have received notice of the hostage situation. >>> a commuter alert now in virginia. state police are on the scene of a serious multicar crash on eastbound i-66. officials tell 9 news now all lanes of eastbound i-66 have been shut down after a collision involving at least three vehicles prior to the roosevelt bridge. we are just getting in good news from these motorists. it may not look like it on this shot but parts of the lane are open and some traffic is getting through in the area. fire officials say initial 918 calls indicated the motorist that caused the crash may have suffered an emergency. several victims were transported from the scene. again, some of the lanes of eastbound 66 have reopened but traffic will be delayed for a while there. >>> firefighters are keeping an eye on the burning rubble of what used to be two homes in northern virginia. still winds helped to spread the flames among several houses in manassas near
flowers from american bridge is going to give us a little chat on the technical part of what we're doing today. [applause] >> thanks. distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, after four painstaking years of planning and watching literally thousands of fabricated pieces come skillfully together, it is massive tower elements of this one-of-a-kind bridge, it is with great satisfaction that we pause in celebration of the installation of first our segment of self-anchored suspension bridge, but no matter how complete the plant, it has to be executed by people. skilled craftsmen, inspectors, and engineers that bring to light to plans and divisions of the designers, dedicated workers to whom today's spot light belongs. on this occasion, i would like to thank the department -- cindy and the department for all of its support and partnership. the toll bridge oversight committee for its leadership. the design joint venture for its vision. the careful -- dpmc who carefully crafted these pieces together, a special thanks for the crescent ship, the professional skill, innovation in meeting the chal
and sensitive caring way. and it will come out of laguna honda. all of us should be proud. all of us should be grateful that we have had a small piece of that particular history. because that history helps me bear a lot of responsibility, to be a husband, to be a father. this institution will always be part of my life. you have taught me how to be that better person. thank you very much and god bless all of you. [applause] >> we are so blessed in our elected leaders in san francisco. senator mark leno has helped us on a bill to make sure that people who need help in a community and want to stay in the community can do so. we are very proud of this new building. at the same time, we want to make sure that people who want to stay in their homes will be able to do so. and so the senator has carried a bill that will enable us, if someone has medicaid, to use those medicaid dollars to increase the number of in-home hours that person has so that we can use those federal dollars instead of hospitalization, instead of long-term care here, in the home. our goal is that the person always has the choi
wants, this man will find. tag along with us as we go on a produce pursuit in northern california. then, meet a farmer who is surrounded by his favorite things--his berries and his brothers. finally, think starting a vegetable garden is hard? our expert has advice to get you started and on your way to a homegrown meal in no time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so we all know that california is king when it comes to growing citrus. and when it comes to growing lemons, no one is bigger than this ventura county farm. and with over 7,000 acres of lush lemon trees, limoneira isn't just the biggest lemon grower in california, but in all of north america. based in santa paula, the farm is a testament to what hard work and determination can do. foundi fathers nathan blanchard and wallace hardison first bought the land way back in 1893 and named the ranch limoneira, which means "lemon lands" in portuguese. >> and at the time, they wanted to bring about the first full-scale commercial operation citrus ranch in the u.s. and fro
especially part merced. that tells us what is happening with the level of service, where transit ridership will be very heavy and where the voting patterns would be. this gave us the right data to tell us what it would look like in 30 years. now we are, "with the best minds in the city -- we are working with the best minds in the city, what we plan to do is look at the big picture in the study and piece together those projects. nothing that you have heard about would preclude the best and most significant roles like never command of the project on the one hand we look at the big picture, on the other hand we work closely with the project sponsor to make sure they are hand in glove on where we need to be. this is two snapshots of where we needed to be. we looked up to the roadway and bridges. we also look at the projects. there are improve frequencies called for. one very popular item, bringing this to the entire west side of 19th ave. if you think about the corridor, this is a long term borough of san francisco state -- this is a long-term goal of san francisco state. whether you are getti
to go. and i want to also acknowledged representatives from the u.s. department of congress -- department of commerce minority development agency who are here today. and of course the private sector, our most important and valued partner in delivering this project. i think bob is here today. those are the folks that are going to be building the town. there are contractors making a big impact here not just in building things but in incorporating a real commitment to small and local business participation, and doing an extraordinary job that i believe is going to become a paradigmatic example in the rest of the state, because these numbers are not to be ignored. and of course the small businesses themselves, [unintelligible] now let me take a second to a knowledge the chair of the san francisco transportation authority, my current boss, a man who i think it's well within the lineup of visionaries and people with the big picture. ross has been a member of the board of supervisors since 2004. he is on his first term as chair of the authority since january. during that time he ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,830 (some duplicates have been removed)